FRIDAY 13th What really happened?

Since we were young, we used to hear our parents say “Oh, its Friday the 13th today”, without us really understanding what that means. In essence, Friday the 13th is supposed to be an ominous day, a bad day, a day of darkness. But if you ask around, very few people will actually know to tell you why exactly this is the case, and the ones that have an idea, their stories vary as to the origins of this superstitious day.

According to historical research and cross examination of different stories of the events unfolding that lead up to the Friday 13th story, the one story that seems to stick out is the one of the Knights of the Templar. So what happened? Why is this a symbolic, superstitious and dark day, and what has it got to do with the Knights of the Templar?

If you have ever read a history book about the crusades, between 1119 and 1312 the Templars were the elite of catholic knights that were fighting in the crusades. They were distinguished by the fact that they were wearing a white cloth with the red cross on top of their armour and they were a highly respected unit, well trained, and very popular amongst people. Most of their members were spread between the United Kingdom and France.

Such was the support for the Order of the Templars that it created a lot of friction and envy for Phillip IV King of France, who with the help of Pope Clement V, falsely accused the Templars as heretics (due to their initiation process) and with a mock trial had found them guilty and sentenced them to death.

As soon as the trial was over many of the Order’s members were imprisoned, tortured and burned at the stake. The execution day happened in October, Friday the 13th, 1307. The order was completely disbanded by 1312.

Could this be the real story behind all the superstition surrounding this day?

Hope you have found this topic helpful and useful. What other stories have you heard about Friday the 13th? Share them below…


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